It's A Keeper: Ginger, Scallion and Garlic Shrimp

When you read that title, don't you just know that this recipe is going to be outstanding? Well, you'd be right. This one can be found in the August and September issue of Every Day with Rachael Ray, but I could not find it in their online archive (bummer, huh?).

This recipe for Ginger, Scallion and Garlic Shrimp was in the Every Day Kitchen section of the magazine, which offers 5 ingredients that can be added to the Every Day Kitchen in order to make several themed recipes. The theme for the August/September issue was Chinese food. I served it with brown rice and it was a treat! Here is the recipe with my comments in brackets:

4 servings
Prep time: 12 minutes (plus marinating)
Cook time: 10 minutes

1 large egg white
1 tablespoon cornstarch
1 1/2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
1 1/2 pounds large (26 to 30 count) shrimp, shelled and deveined [I was disappointed that my store did not have any raw shrimp, so I had to buy cooked ones, but it still turned out wonderfully. I assume it would be even better with raw shrimp.]
6 garlic cloves, finely chopped [Any recipe with that much garlic=yummy.]
One 1 1/2-inch piece of ginger, scraped and finely chopped (about 1 teaspoon) [I assume scraped means that you take the brown skin off the ginger. At least, that's what I did.]
1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes (optional) [Optional? Not in my book. Put in a whole teaspoon! Live crazy!]
1/4 cup canola or vegetable oil
3 scallions, halved lengthwise, cut into 1-inch pieces, dark green parts set aside [So, I didn't really read all those details when I made it. I just chopped up the whole thing. But I did set aside the dark green parts when I finally did read it. Still turned out fine!]
Steamed rice

1. In a medium bowl, whisk the egg white with the cornstarch, sugar, salt and pepper until a paste forms. [A paste will eventually form. Patience is a virtue.] Add the shrimp and toss to coat. Set the shrimp aside to marinate for 10 minutes. In a small bowl, combine the garlic, ginger and red pepper flakes; set aside.

2. Heat a large, heavy skillet over high heat for 3 minutes. [I used my regulation sized cast iron skillet for this. It worked perfectly.] Add the oil and swirl to coat the bottom of the skillet. Add the shrimp and the white and light green scallion pieces [this is where I figured out that I messed up with the scallions] and stir to coat with the oil. Cook, stirring and scraping up any brown bits from the bottom of the skillet, until the shrimp are almost cooked through, about 2 minutes. Add the garlic mixture and the dark green scallion pieces and cook, stirring, until the shrimp are cooked through, about 1 minute more. [Since I used cooked shrimp, I just did this until I thought they were warmed through.] Season to taste with salt and pepper. Transfer the shrimp to a large platter and serve with steamed rice.

6 comments:

  1. "I assume scraped means that you take the brown skin off the ginger. At least, that's what I did."

    That's right, and a great safe way to do it is to skip the knife for the scraping and use a spoon which you hold with your thumb in the bowl and scrape using the edge. The skin comes right off.

    Mike

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks, Mike. I usually do it the way Rachael recommends, which is to cut it off with a knife. Looks like her magazine is trying to break her bad habits (but didn't include enough detail for a cooking novice like me).

    ReplyDelete
  3. Looks good. I normally just cut it off too.

    ReplyDelete
  4. You and me both, Rachel. Thanks to Mike, we can keep all our fingers.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Hi! Thanks for linking to my blog in your weekly roundup!

    This shrimp recipe is my all-time favorite. It's so simple and yet so incredibly tasty.

    ReplyDelete
  6. You are welcome! This recipe is definitely one of my husband's favorites, too. I am not a huge shrimp fan, but I always get major points when I make them for him.

    ReplyDelete

Thanks for leaving a comment! Reading comments and responding to them is one of my favorite parts of having a blog, so thanks for contributing.